‘Safe’ teen drinking? Here’s why parents shouldn’t facilitate it.

Originally published in the Washington Post's online version on Apr. 1, 2019. “Well, we did it when we were their age.” This common refrain, popular among parents with a permissive attitude toward underage drinking, is often coupled with well-intentioned efforts to keep adolescents safe while consuming alcohol: Think encouraging alcohol-imbibing teens to take advantage of ride programs like Uber, to spend the night at a friend’s house, or to drink in one’s own home as opposed to unknown

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Rejections hurt. Here’s how to help your child during college-application season.

Article originally published in the On Parenting section of the Washington Post on March 5, 2019. Anita Walia’s daughter had always been an overachiever. She made the girls’ varsity soccer team as a high school freshman, earned good grades in the most challenging courses at the private school she attended and received high marks on standardized tests. So, when it came time to apply to colleges in fall 2017, she felt ready. But she wasn’t prepared for what happened next. Walia’s daughter

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UMD Students Deserve Better

Originally published in the Baltimore Sun on December 13, 2018. Like countless other parents of college-bound high school seniors living in Maryland, I started steering my daughter toward her state’s flagship university last year, when we began talking about college options. The

University of Maryland, College Park, with its strong academic reputation — it touts itself as “one of the nation’s preeminent public research universities” — and reasonable price tag, seemed like a

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Two-Sport Wonder

Originally published in the Towson Times on September 5, 2018. Of the nearly 8 million high school athletes in the United States, only a small fraction — about 2 percent — will earn a college athletic scholarship, according to the National Collegiate Athletic Association. Then, there’s Towson native Julia Dorsey, a rising 12th-twelfth grader at McDonogh School. She falls into a category of high school athletes so unique that statistics reflecting her circumstances don’t even

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How We Get ADHD Wrong

Originally published in Education Week on February 13, 2018 Today, more than 10 percent of all children ages 5-17 in the United States receive a diagnosis of ADHD, despite the American Psychiatric Association’s estimation that only 5 percent actually have the disorder. The disparity is even starker for boys, 14 percent of whom end up diagnosed with ADHD. My son is one of those millions of boys who have been diagnosed with this greatly overused label. My 15-year-old son has been dubbed

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UMBC professors are navigating the startup economy – and finding harmony between research and commerce

Originally published in the Summer 2016 issue of UMBC Magazine. UMBC professor of music Linda Dusman found herself sitting next to UMBC President Freeman A. Hrabowski, III at a UMBC Orchestra concert in 2010. Between movements, she whispered snippets of background information about the music to one of the orchestra’s biggest fans. Because Dusman is a musical composer with a deeply ingrained respect for the traditions of classical concerts, the experience provided a rare “aha” moment.

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Caroline Blatti Takes Over as Head of All-girls’ Roland Park Country School

Originally published on October 11, 2016 in the Baltimore Sun. On the first day of the 2016–2017 academic year, as students at Roland Park Country School filed into the building, they were greeted by two contrasting figures: bagpiper musicians, a longstanding "first-day-back" tradition at the school, and new Head of School Caroline Blatti, the first in 25 years and only the seventh in the school's 100-plus-year history. Blatti, who was formally installed on Oct. 7, succeeds long-term

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Meet Julian Baron, weather forecasting wonder-boy

Originally published in Baltimorefishbowl.com, April 21, 2014 Wondering if you’ll need to rent a tent at an outdoor event you’re having next weekend? Worried that your upcoming travel plans will be interrupted by storms? Just ask 14-year-old Pikesville resident Julian Baron. Plenty of other people do, from his classmates at Gilman School who want to know if the weather will impact their baseball schedule to the 300-plus people who follow him on Facebook for the local weather

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model united nations conference celebrates 15th anniversary

Originally published in Johns Hopkins Arts & Sciences, Spring 2012 Clad in business suits and high heels, flocks of young men and women hurry down Baltimore’s Pratt Street toward the Renaissance Hotel on a breezy February evening. Soon, all 1,650 or so individuals gather in the hotel’s ballroom for opening ceremonies of the much-anticipated four-day event for which they’ve traversed 14 states and two countries to attend. If not for the barely repressed giggles and high-energy vibe

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baltimore-area college seniors entering unstable job market

Originally published in the Baltimore Business Journal, April 22, 2011 Zach Parkinson feels fortunate. Even in a stammering economy, the Johns Hopkins University senior knows his entrance into the job market is better timed than the class of 2010. The international relations major astutely sums up the sentiment of countless Maryland graduating seniors as they search want ads and email resumes. “We’re thankful that we weren’t searching for jobs last year. It’s not a great time, but it

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